What is React?

  • React is a front-end JavaScript library developed by Facebook in 2011.
  • It follows the component based approach which helps in building reusable UI components.
  • It is used for developing complex and interactive web and mobile UI.
  • Even though it was open-sourced only in 2015, it has one of the largest communities supporting it.

What are the major features of React?

  • It uses VirtualDOM instead RealDOM considering that RealDOM manipulations are expensive.
  • Supports server-side rendering.
  • Follows Unidirectional* data flow or data binding.
  • Uses reusable/composable UI components to develop the view.

What is JSX?

JSX is a XML-like syntax extension to ECMAScript (the acronym stands for JavaScript XML). Basically it just provides syntactic sugar for the React.createElement() function, giving us expressiveness of JavaScript along with HTML like template syntax.

In the example below text inside <h1> tag return as JavaScript function to the render function.

class App extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return(
      <div>
        <h1>{'Welcome to React world!'}</h1>
      </div>
    )
  }
}

What is the difference between Element and Component?

An Element is a plain object describing what you want to appear on the screen in terms of the DOM nodes or other components. Elements can contain other Elements in their props. Creating a React element is cheap. Once an element is created, it is never mutated.

How to create components in React?

There are two possible ways to create a component.

Function Components: This is the simplest way to create a component. Those are pure JavaScript functions that accept props object as first parameter and return React elements:

function Greeting({ message }) {
  return <h1>{`Hello, ${message}`}</h1>

}

Class Components: You can also use ES6 class to define a component. The above function component can be written as:

class Greeting extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <h1>{`Hello, ${this.props.message}`}</h1>
  }
}

When to use a Class Component over a Function Component?

If the component needs state or lifecycle methods then use class component otherwise use function component.

What are Pure Components?

React.PureComponent is exactly the same as React.Component except that it handles the shouldComponentUpdate() method for you. When props or state changes, PureComponent will do a shallow comparison on both props and state. Component on the other hand won't compare current props and state to next out of the box. Thus, the component will re-render by default whenever shouldComponentUpdate is called.

Differentiate between Real DOM and Virtual DOM.

Real DOM Virtual  DOM
1. It updates slow. 1. It updates faster.
2. Can directly update HTML. 2. Can’t directly update HTML.
3. Creates a new DOM if element updates. 3. Updates the JSX if element updates.
4. DOM manipulation is very expensive. 4. DOM manipulation is very easy.
5. Too much of memory wastage. 5. No memory wastage.

What are the limitations of React?

  • React is just a library, not a full-blown framework
  • Its library is very large and takes time to understand
  • It can be little difficult for the novice programmers to understand
  • Coding gets complex as it uses inline templating and JSX

What is the purpose of render() in React.

Each React component must have a render() mandatorily. It returns a single React element which is the representation of the native DOM component. If more than one HTML element needs to be rendered, then they must be grouped together inside one enclosing tag such as <form>, <group>,<div> etc. This function must be kept pure i.e., it must return the same result each time it is invoked.

What is Virtual DOM in React?

DOM plays an important role in terms of web application performance, thus there are tons of frameworks are available who manipulates the DOM directly by adding, modifying or removing any existing element. When we perform any action on a page, at that time content should be updated based on the result of action and it should be reflected in the DOM. In React, Virtual DOM plays an important role by updating DOM which marked as a dirty. Basically, React’s Virtual DOM convert the dirty component into Virtual image of a component and compare it with the existing DOM, and based on the result of the comparison, the new DOM will be replaced by the existing DOM.

What is a State in React?

The state is an instance of React Component Class can be defined as an object of a set of observable properties that control the behavior of the component. In other words, the State of a component is an object that holds some information that may change over the lifetime of the component.

What is Props in React?

Props is the shorthand for Properties in React. They are read-only components which must be kept pure i.e. immutable. They are always passed down from the parent to the child components throughout the application. A child component can never send a prop back to the parent component. This help in maintaining the unidirectional data flow and are generally used to render the dynamically generated data.

What are the different phases of React component’s lifecycle?

There are three different phases of React component’s lifecycle:

Initial Rendering Phase: This is the phase when the component is about to start its life journey and make its way to the DOM.

Updating Phase: Once the component gets added to the DOM, it can potentially update and re-render only when a prop or state change occurs. That happens only in this phase.

Unmounting Phase: This is the final phase of a component’s life cycle in which the component is destroyed and removed from the DOM.

Explain the lifecycle methods of React components in detail.

Some of the most important lifecycle methods are:

componentWillMount() – Executed just before rendering takes place both on the client as well as server-side.

componentDidMount() – Executed on the client side only after the first render.

componentWillReceiveProps() – Invoked as soon as the props are received from the parent class and before another render is called.

shouldComponentUpdate() – Returns true or false value based on certain conditions. If you want your component to update, return true else return false. By default, it returns false.

componentWillUpdate() – Called just before rendering takes place in the DOM.

componentDidUpdate() – Called immediately after rendering takes place.

componentWillUnmount() – Called after the component is unmounted from the DOM. It is used to clear up the memory spaces.

What is the difference between state and props?

Both props and state are plain JavaScript objects. While both of them hold information that influences the output of render, they are different in their functionality with respect to component. Props get passed to the component similar to function parameters whereas state is managed within the component similar to variables declared within a function.

What is an event in React?

In React, events are the triggered reactions to specific actions like mouse hover, mouse click, key press, etc. Handling these events are similar to handling events in DOM elements. But there are some syntactical differences like:

  • Events are named using camel case instead of just using the lowercase.
  • Events are passed as functions instead of strings.

The event argument contains a set of properties, which are specific to an event. Each event type contains its own properties and behavior which can be accessed via its event handler only.

What are synthetic events in React?

Synthetic events are the objects which act as a cross-browser wrapper around the browser’s native event. They combine the behavior of different browsers into one API. This is done to make sure that the events show consistent properties across different browsers.

What is the use of refs?

The ref is used to return a reference to the element. They should be avoided in most cases, however, they can be useful when you need a direct access to the DOM element or an instance of a component.

How to create refs?

Refs are created using React.createRef() method and attached to React elements via the ref attribute. In order to use refs throughout the component, just assign the ref to the instance property within constructor.

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.myRef = React.createRef()
  }
  render() {
    return <div ref={this.myRef} />
  }
}


class UserForm extends Component {
  handleSubmit = () => {
    console.log('Input Value is: ', this.input.value)
  }
  render () {
    return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <input
          type='text'
          ref={(input) => this.input = input}
        /> // Access DOM input in handle submit
        <button type='submit'>{'Submit'}</button>
      </form>
    )
  }
}

What are forward refs?

Ref forwarding is a feature that lets some components take a ref they receive, and pass it further down to a child.

const ButtonElement = React.forwardRef((props, ref) => (
  <button ref={ref} className="CustomButton">
    {props.children}
  </button>
));

// Create ref to the DOM button:
const ref = React.createRef();
<ButtonElement ref={ref}>{'Forward Ref'}</ButtonElement>

What is the difference between Shadow DOM and Virtual DOM?

The Shadow DOM is a browser technology designed primarily for scoping variables and CSS in web components. The Virtual DOM is a concept implemented by libraries in JavaScript on top of browser APIs.

What is React Fiber?

Fiber is the new reconciliation engine or reimplementation of core algorithm in React v16. The goal of React Fiber is to increase its suitability for areas like animation, layout, gestures, ability to pause, abort, or reuse work and assign priority to different types of updates; and new concurrency primitives.

What are controlled components?

A component that controls the input elements within the forms on subsequent user input is called Controlled Component, i.e, every state mutation will have an associated handler function.

For example, to write all the names in uppercase letters, we use handleChange as below,

handleChange(event) {
  this.setState({value: event.target.value.toUpperCase()})
}

What are uncontrolled components?

The Uncontrolled Components are the ones that store their own state internally, and you query the DOM using a ref to find its current value when you need it. This is a bit more like traditional HTML.

In the below UserProfile component, the name input is accessed using ref.

class UserProfile extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.handleSubmit = this.handleSubmit.bind(this)
    this.input = React.createRef()
  }

  handleSubmit(event) {
    alert('A name was submitted: ' + this.input.current.value)
    event.preventDefault()
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <label>
          {'Name:'}
          <input type="text" ref={this.input} />
        </label>
        <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
      </form>
    );
  }
}


In most cases, it's recommend to use controlled components to implement forms.

What is the difference between createElement and cloneElement?

JSX elements will be transpiled to React.createElement() functions to create React elements which are going to be used for the object representation of UI. Whereas cloneElement is used to clone an element and pass it new props.

How are forms created in React?

React forms are similar to HTML forms. But in React, the state is contained in the state property of the component and is only updated via setState(). Thus the elements can’t directly update their state and their submission is handled by a JavaScript function. This function has full access to the data that is entered by the user into a form.

handleSubmit(event) {
    alert('A name was submitted: ' + this.state.value);
    event.preventDefault();
}
 
render() {
    return (       
         
<form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
            <label>
                Name:
                <input type="text" value={this.state.value} 
                                 onChange=this.handleSubmit} />
            </label>
            <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
        </form>
 
    );
}

What are Higher Order Components(HOC)?

Higher Order Component is an advanced way of reusing the component logic. Basically, it’s a pattern that is derived from React’s compositional nature. HOC are custom components which wrap another component within it. They can accept any dynamically provided child component but they won’t modify or copy any behavior from their input components. You can say that HOC are ‘pure’ components.

What can you do with HOC?

HOC can be used for many tasks like:

  • Code reuse, logic and bootstrap abstraction
  • Render High jacking
  • State abstraction and manipulation
  • Props manipulation

What is the significance of keys in React?

Keys are used for identifying unique Virtual DOM Elements with their corresponding data driving the UI. They help React to optimize the rendering by recycling all the existing elements in the DOM. These keys must be a unique number or string, using which React just reorders the elements instead of re-rendering them. This leads to increase in application’s performance.